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Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Fair Debates.com













Where were the other candidates in 2012? 





IF ALL qualified presidential candidates were welcome to participate...

​​The 2012 "Official" Presidential Debates would have looked like this:


Governor Gary Johnson and Dr. Jill Stein obtained their ballot access the hard way - via petitions in states across the country.


They were the only two candidates beside the Democrat and Republican who appeared on enough state ballots to get elected as the President of the United States by the Electoral College. ​Yet, both Johnson & Stein were excluded from the "official" televised presidential debates. 

So, why did only 2 of these 4 electable candidates appear on the debate stage?


Well, the most bizarre thing happened...


Our America Initiative | Published on Apr 3, 2015

Quote "The Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) has a rule that candidates must average 15% in popular polls. The catch is that it is virtually impossible for any candidate without the free publicity and exposure provided by the two major parties, the media and, of course, nationally-televised debates, to reach 15%. It's a classic "Catch 22". Even with his millions of personal wealth, the last third party candidate to appear in a CPD-sponsored debate, Ross Perot, would not have qualified under the 15% rule. Ironically, after he DID appear, polls showed a majority of Americans believed Perot won the debates.

The official-sounding and acting Commission on Presidential Debates is, in reality, a private organization created by the Republican and Democratic parties and funded by special interests whose goal is to protect the status quo. Thus, it is no surprise that the Debate Commission has adopted “rules” that make it virtually impossible for an independent or third-party candidate to ever participate in the ​all-important Presidential Debates.


If this frustrates you, you're not alone


Going way back...more than 60% of Americans wanted Ross Perot to participate in the 1996 Presidential Debates. The CPD lost three sponsors in 2012 due to their bipartisan-exclusive-to-democrats-and-republicans- political-theater. And recently, a 2014 Gallup poll found that Americans are fed up with the two major parties.


A majority of U.S. adults, 58%, say a third U.S. political party is needed because the Republican and Democratic parties 'do such a poor job' representing the American people." - Jeffrey M. Jones


Most Americans have no idea that the official-sounding and acting CPD is a private organization created by the Republican and Democratic Parties.  But now YOU KNOW.  So get involved.  With polls showing that “independent” voters now constitute a majority of the American electorate, this duopoly simply isn’t fair -- and must be changed. 


Sign the petition to demand that one straightforward, common sense change be made in the rules for future presidential debates: Rather than picking and choosing polls to decide who can participate (polls that will always favor the Democratic and Republican candidates), simply allow participation by any candidate who has qualified for enough states’ presidential ballots to have a mathematical chance of being elected.  


Join the fight and support the excluded 2012 candidates - Jill Stein, Gary Johnson, their campaigns, the Green and the Libertarian parties to fight for Fair Debates for ALL candidates of the future.  Your donation to help fund the CPD lawsuit could be the single most important contribution you make to our future in the United States of America." end quote

Join the fight to save the debates.Our future depends on it.

Invest in this historical fight
Sign the Petition
Take Action

Why are Third parties excluded in the presidential debates? The following video my shed some light on the topic.C-Span Cotober 3, 1988 

Nancy Neuman announced that the League of Women Voters has withdrawn its sponsorship of presidential debates after disputes with national parties and campaigns over the format of the debates could not be resolved.








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